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Edward FIELD

Male 1769 - 1826  (57 years)


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  • Name Edward FIELD  [1, 2
    Born 1769  Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3
    Gender Male 
    Arrival New South Wales Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Certificates ? Marriage (Ancestry: Edward_Field_Marriage_Entry) 
    Photos? Grave (DSC_7734) 
    Residence Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Died 21 Jan 1826  Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3
    Residence 30 Jun 1843  Penrith, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Buried Castlereagh Cemetery, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Arrived in Australia as a Private on the Scarborough in 1790 (second fleet)

      From a book called Sydney cove 1791 - 1792 by John Cobley:
      Monday 9th Jan 1792
      Private Edward Field & superintendent Mr Clark, gave evidence against Samuel Gates accused of robbing the Governor's garden. (Source Jenny French)

      Note: unsure if this is Edward or his son Edward.
      ---
      We have often said that Edward Field did some work as a blacksmith for William Cox when he built the first road over the Blue Mountains. Here is the proof:

      Extracts taken from a diary kept by William Cox in making the road over the Blue Mountains from Emu Plains to a new country.

      1814
      JULY 20: Sent the smith to Field's to make four new axes and steel two of the English ones. Gave him 20 lbs of iron and 4 lb of steel. Fine dry weather.

      JULY 21: The smith completed laying the axes and steeled five others. Much trouble today with the axes, the timber being hard, they all turned, Kept the grindstone constantly going. Made good progress on Emu Plains, the men worked very well. Weather clear and frosty.

      JULY 24: Examined the ground and marked the road from the creek to the first depot (with Lewis) . Gave a pound of tobacco to Field for a lot of cabbage, which I gave to the workmen. Purchased 4 cwt. 1 gr. of bran for myself which I forwarded to the depot at 10 shillings per cwt. delivered at Martin's. The workmen exerted them civic during the week, much to my satisfaction.

      There were comments for nearly every day but I have only given those regarding Field.
      This was printed in The Arms Chronicle put out by The Nepean District Historical Society. They will tell more in their next issue and if it mentions our Field ancestors I will let you know.

      ---

      From Dharug & Dungaree. The History of Penrith & St Marys to 1860. Robert Murry & Kate Watson,

      (pages 48-49)
      Another early Bird's Eye Corner settler was Edward Field, who arrived on the Scarborough in 1790 as a twenty-one-year-old private in the New South Wales Corps. He was stationed at Rose Hill and soon began to cohabit with Elizabeth Mitchell, nee Dixon. Elizabeth had been tried at New Sarum, Wiltshire, on 6 March 1790 and sentenced to seven years transportation. She was married at the time, but her husband did not follow her to the colony. On arrival at Sydney Cove, she formed a liaison with James Wilson and bore him a child, Sarah, in May 1792.

      Elizabeth and Edward had eight Children over the next twenty years. They only married in 1808, not an uncommon pattern for convicts and soldiers in the early colony. In 1802 Edward was discharged from the corps after the apparent end of the Napoleonic War. By then he was squatting on one hundred acres at Bird's Eye Corner. However, like many squatters, he did not receive a formal grant for another year also. A few months later, he sold twenty acres. By then he had thirty acres cropped with wheat, maize, barley and potatoes. Edward also worked from the farm as a blacksmith, a trade he probably learnt before he joined the New South Wales Corps, and he had a spirits licence. The Ropes and the Fields strengthened their early ties as squatters when their children, John Rope and Maria Field, married in 1817.

      Flood March 1806
      (page 59)
      Edward Field lost forty bushels of wheat, which he needed to feed his wife and children in the flood

      Over the Top (Building of the road over the Blue Mountains)
      (page 112)
      From the journal of William Cox 19 July 1814. Sent the smith to the Field's [Edward Field, a Nepean Settler who was also a blacksmith] to make four new axes and steel two of the English ones. Gave him twenty lb. of iron and 4 lb. of steel. Fine, Dry weather.

      ---

      From Field Family Newsletter 7

      EDWARD FIELD was enlisted as a Private on the 102nd Regiment of Foot, the New South Wales Corps, on 27 July 1789, some 7 weeks after its formation. He came to the Colony of New South Wales with the second fleet, arriving in Sydney on the “Scarborough” on 28 June 1790. On 13 December 1794 he received a grant of 25 acres on the west side of Iron Cove Creek, an area which is now Five Dock. That grant was subsequently revoked, and on 30 June 1803 EDWARD received in its place a grant of 100 acres of land at Castlereagh. He received a further grant of 100 acres at upper Cranebrook (now submerged as part of the Nepean Lakes complex) on 10/5/1809. On 8 August 1801 he was granted his discharge from the New South Wales Corps. In addition to his farming, he is recalled for his skills as a blacksmith. In particular, he is recorded as having provided blacksmithing services and sold produce to William Cox’s team that constructed the first road over the Blue Mountains.

      ---------------

      Text: Notes on EDWARD and ELIZABETH FIELD
      EDWARD FIELD was enlisted as a Private in the 102nd Regiment of Foot, the New South Wales Corps, on 27 July 1789, some 7 weeks after its formation. He came to the Colony of New South Wales with the second fleet, arriving in Sydney on the Scarborough on 28 June 1790. On 13 December 1794 he received a grant of 25 acres on the west side of Iron Cove Creek, an area which is now Fivedock. That grant was subsequently revoked, and on 30 June 1803 EDWARD received in its place a grant of 100 acres of land at Castlereagh. He received a further grant of 100 acres at upper Cranebrook (now submerged as part of the Nepean Lakes complex) on 10/5/1809. On 8 August 1801 he was granted his discharge from the New South Wales Corps. In addition to his farming, he is recalled for his skills as a blacksmith. In particular, he is recorded as having provided blacksmithing services and sold produce to William Cox's team that constructed the first road over the Blue Mountains.

      There are stories to the effect that EDWARD had a brother in Australia. These stories usually claim this brother was William Field, a convict on the first fleet, and that it was in effect to join William that EDWARD enlisted in the New South Wales Corps. Certainly there was a William Field residing in the Castlereagh area at the same time as EDWARD. Those who undertook the basic research for this site know of no evidence that EDWARD FIELD had a brother in the the Colony of New South Wales and wonder how it would be possible to prove any such connection. If any researcher believes they have evidence supporting the Edward/William relationship Colin Field would be pleased to have the opportunity to review it.

      Other notes on EDWARD FIELD, as summarised from Michael Flynn's book The Second Fleet (Flynn, M., The Second Fleet, Sydney, 1993) are as follows:

      embarked on Scarborough 22 October 1789

      was a witness at a wedding in the colony in December 1790

      January 1792 appeared as a witness in the Parramatta trial of Samuel Gates for robbing the Governor's garden

      on discharge from the Corps is recorded as having found a substitute for the 1806 muster recorded as holding 80 acres by grant (just over 31 acres of which were cultivated in wheat, maize, barley, potatoes, orchard and garden) - owned a horse, 15 sheep and 10 pigs, and held 2 bushels of wheat and 10 of maize in store, fully supporting himself, a woman, 6 children (3 male, 3 female) and a convict

      February 1810 petitioned Governor Macquarie for confirmation of his grant, stating he had a wife and seven children and had already spent forty pound on developing the land

      sold 57 acres of his land to Charles Pickering for eighty pound and a house at The Rocks, Sydney
      October 1816 was in financial difficulty when part of his land was sold to meet debts

      1820 while living on the remaining portion of his original grant supporting his wife and four children, petitioned for more land to compensate for the heavy losses he had suffered in recent floods
      1822 recorded as a landholder in the Castlereagh area with 40 acres (about 28 acres sown in wheat, maize, peas, beans, potatoes, orchard and garden) owning 2 horses, 2 cattle, 25 pigs and holding 40 bushels of maize in store August 1824 petitioned the Governor for additional land to keep his two horses and an increasing herd of cattle 1825, with wife Elizabeth, jointly subscribed to the local branch of the Wesleyan Missionary Society

      ELIZABETH (SARAH) MITCHELL, known as Betty Mitchell, was convicted on 6 March 1790 at the Assizes. Her crime was aiding and abetting in breaking into a dwelling in Studley, North Wiltshire, and the stealing of 5 cheeses and sundry other articles. Though recorded details differ on this question, her trial was most likely at Salisbury. She was sentenced to 7 years transportation. ELIZABETH was transported on the Mary Ann, arriving Sydney 9 July 1791.

      ELIZABETH (SARAH) MITCHELL's first child, a daughter named SARAH, was born 19 May 1792, the father being one JAMES WILSON. It seems likely that about that time ELIZABETH (SARAH) was assigned to EDWARD FIELD. The first four children of ELIZABETH and EDWARD were born out of wedlock, a not uncommon occurrence in the very early days of the Colony of New South Wales. In early 1805, they married at St John's Church at Parramatta.

      ELIZABETH (SARAH) is sometimes recorded as Elizabeth (or Betty) Dixon, and it is sometimes claimed that this was her maiden name. Those who undertook the basic research for this site know of no evidence that ELIZABETH's maiden name was Dixon, and indeed the evidence is otherwise. The name Dixon as it applies to ELIZABETH MITCHELL comes to us from Thomas Davies Mutch, the compiler of the "Mutch Index". Where Mutch got it from is not known. A likely source of the name is either an alias or an early association of ELIZABETH's.

      Though troubled by serious flooding, the farm at Castlereagh was obviously a success. In The Gazette of 5 February 1809 it was advertised for sale. The advertisement describes it as "a capital farm at the Nepean ... in praise of which too much cannot be said (including) upwards of an acre ... laid out in an orchard containing some of the best trees any where to be procured, of the orange, lemon, peach and other kinds (as well as) a public pound".

      Both EDWARD and ELIZABETH are buried in the old Castlereagh cemetery, which is located near the junction of Church Street and Keech Road, Castlereagh.

      ELIZABETH used the name SARAH from time to time, but no evidence has been found that it was ever formally one of her names. Throughout this website the name SARAH, as it applies to ELIZABETH FIELD (nee MITCHELL), has therefore been placed in brackets.
    Person ID I963  The Rawsthorne Family Tree
    Last Modified 14 Nov 2015 

    Father William FIELD 
    Relationship Natural 
    Family ID F11745  Group Sheet

    Family Elizabeth Sarah MITCHELL,   b. Jan 1770, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Jun 1837, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 67 years) 
    Married 20 Feb 1805  St John's Church of England, Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3, 4
    Children 
     1. Mary Ann FIELD,   b. 04 Mar 1795, Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Nov 1865, Bugabigli Station, Forbes, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     2. Edward FIELD,   b. 16 Sep 1797, Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 07 Dec 1846, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years)
     3. Maria FIELD,   b. 01 Sep 1801, Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Aug 1842, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 40 years)
     4. George FIELD,   b. 18 Jun 1803, Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 May 1872, Mt Pleasant, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     5. William FIELD,   b. 15 Apr 1806, Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Nov 1853, Mt York, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years)
     6. Sophia FIELD,   b. 21 Jun 1807, Edinglassie Nursing Home, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jul 1871, Forbes, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
     7. Thomas FIELD,   b. 23 Feb 1811, Nepean River, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jun 1866, Bogabagil Station, Forbes, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years)
     8. John FIELD,   b. 24 Aug 1815, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Aug 1815, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 14 Nov 2015 
    Family ID F459  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    Scarborough
    Scarborough
    Private Edward Field arrived in Australia on the Scarborough on 27 July 1789. The death rate during the voyage was 1 death for every 3.5 Convicts

    Headstones
    DSCF6374.JPG
    DSCF6374.JPG

  • Sources 
    1. [S393] Public Member Trees, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;), Database online.
      Record for Edward Field

    2. .

    3. [S79] From a Distant Field, Colin Field, Book: Version 3 (Self Published).

    4. [S221] New South Wales Births, Deaths & Marriages.
      V1805300 147A and V1805626 3A