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John LEES

Male 1771 - 1836  (65 years)


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  • Photos
    The Ganges
    The Ganges
    John Lees was transported on this ship

    Headstones
    DSCF6414.JPG
    DSCF6414.JPG

  • Name John LEES  [1
    Born 1771  Staffordshire, Worcestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender Male 
    Certificates ? Marriage (14), Death (23) 
    Photos? Grave (D0004-13A), Grave (DSCF6414) 
    Died 28 Aug 1836  Nepean River, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried 31 Aug 1836  Castlereagh Wesleyan Church, New South Wales, Australia (Reinterred in 1921 after his initial burial in the Church of England Cemetery in Castlereagh) Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Field family newsletter 5

      Address delivered by G. Bunyan, Esq.,
      23rd May 1953
      “It gives me much pleasure to be given the honour of presenting to you some of the history of Castlereagh, so named by Gov. Macquarie, Dec 10th 1810. As you know Castlereagh is one of the five towns named by the Governor on this date, and can, with Parramatta and Windsor, truly be called the Cradle of Australia. The first visit of a white man was made when Capt. Finch discovered the river, nearby here.

      In 1789, on his return, Gov. Phillip named the river Nepean after Lord Nepean, secretary of State.

      Then in 1800, a body of settlers squatted at the place now known as Bird’s Eye Corner. These early pioneers included Jacob Russell, Pierce Collett, Randall, Rope, Colless, Frederick, Field, Lees, McCarthy, Lewin, Sherringham Morris, to mention a few names. Let it be noted that the descendants of some of these pioneers are still living here, or in the district.

      An Anglican Church was erected at a very early date and named St. Andrews. This Church was used prior to the foundation stone being laid for St. Matthews, Windsor. This Church was originally intended to be called St. Andrews but on account of the old church at Castlereagh bearing that name, the Windsor Church was re-named St.Matthews, and the Cathedral in Sydney named St. Andrews.

      Prior to 1811 burials were allowed anywhere. Gov. Macquarie issued an order in that year that deaths were to be reported to the Police and the person buried in a proper consecrated burial ground, so all the cemeteries at that time were Church of England. A survey of the tomb-stones will disclose names of all denominations interred there. This applies to the old Castlereagh Cemetery, just off Church Lane. The old church known as Fulton Church was situated some 100 yards off Church Lane, on the way to the cemetery.

      It was here that Rev. Henry Fulton opened a school in 1814. One of the first to be educated here was Tompson, Australia’s first poet. There was a very early school at Bird’s Eye Corner conducted by Mrs. Collett. This school was situated on the farm now known as Sheen’s.

      John Lees, one of the first pioneers, a time-expired soldier, had a grant of land immediately opposite this Public School. He was looked upon as not being the best type of man, but one night he went to get some wood from the heap and was bitten on the wrist by a snake. He was hurried Richmond for treatment, and his recovery appeared to him as a sign from God to mend his ways. A Wesleyan Mission coming to the district, converted John Lees and he gave to the Church one acre of land which he worked for 2 years giving all the proceeds to the Church funds. In 1817 John Lees built the first Wesleyan Church in Australia on the land, but it was destroyed in about 1840 and the present church erected in 1847.

      About this time a Denominational School was started by the Wesleyan Church with 2 male teachers, and Mrs. Collett’s school closed down. This school carried on until 1878 when the Government built the present school. At these different schools many prominent people received their education, viz:- Tompson, the poet; Toby Ryan, a very early member of Parliament; Alexandria Frazer, Penrith’s first Post-master; Dame Mary Gilmore; Michael Long, eight times Mayor of Penrith, etc.

      Some early families of Castlereagh were: Singles, Lieut. Purcell, Hadley Childs, Howell, Samuel Terry of Mt. Pleasant, Hugh Beattie who built Terry Lodge, Parkers, Jacksons, Willetts, McCarthy, to mention a few.

      All of this information is available at the Penrith City Library.

      ---------------

      From field Newsletter 9

      From the Australian Editor of The Upper Room Rev. Dr. Gloster Udy

      “Sunday 24th June 2001 was a great occasion. As the sun poured down on the heritage Wesleyan Chapel at Castlereagh folk began to arrive from near and far to celebrate the opening of the Upper Room Bell Tower as part of our celebration of Federation Year. To recapture the distant past we had three descendants of early settlers at Castlereagh namely: John Lees, George Colless and John Parker. The ladies who spoke of their relatives were Merle Cavanagh, Jan Chivers and Laurel Russell.

      Our indebtedness to past pioneers was remembered in a prayer offered by Dr. Jim Udy. Then as we focused attention on the present we had the Mayor of Penrith Council Councillor David Bradbury speak on the significance of Castlereagh to Penrith City Council and then the Commonwealth Minister for sport and recreation, Hon. Jackie Kelly M.P. spoke of the significance of Federation and also the Federation Grant given to the Upper Room towards its Bell Tower project at Castlereagh.

      These speeches were interspersed with great traditional hymns: “Now Thank We All Our God” and “O For A Thousand Tongues To Sing”.

      Turning to the future the CEO of Penrith Lakes Corporation, Mr. Ian Stanton, told of the significance of our Castlereagh heritage properties when they become a cul-de-sac on the edge of a huge National Park.

      Ron Shepherd then explained the value of “Change Ringing” the bells. He was the guiding hand in enabling us to secure the gift of 8 bells from Christ Church Kiama. He made the steel structure to hold the bells in the new tower and he installed the bells. It was his mother, Mrs. Doreen Shepherd whom we asked to open the Bell Tower after which she was presented with a beautiful bouquet by a young mother - Anita Steenbecke - dressed as an eighteenth century young adult.

      A most significant prayer of dedication of the bells was then led by Mrs. Margaret McMullan from the Kiama Anglican Church.

      As if to demonstrate the effect which a peal of bells can have on listeners, as members of the Australian New Zealand Association pealed out the distinctive sound of our bells 8 or 9 people visiting the nearby Olympic Regatta Centre were drawn to the chapel grounds to enjoy the lift of spirit resulting from ringing the bells.

      May you one day dear readers come and listen to the heritage bells on Australian Methodism’s most historic sight.

      With grace and peace,
      Gloster Udy.”

      I spoke to Rev. Dr. Gloster Udy about this event and told him about our relationship with John Lees and that our newsletter was about the descendants of Edward Field. He informed me that Edward Field owned property opposite the chapel and that Field also donated a block of land to the church.
      He invited me and all of you to the special service that is held on 4th Sunday of each month by The Upper Room at 2-30pm in this historic church.

      With the great quarries being dug and plans of rehabilitation instituted only a few people remained in Castlereagh. Just one service a month was held at the historic Castlereagh Chapel.

      Plans emerged that in the new millennium Castlereagh Road would be cut by the Lakes Scheme so there would be only one road available coming from Cranebrook. This would make the Historic Chapel very isolated so they asked the President of the Methodist World Historical Society (Rev. Dr. Jim Udy) if he could suggest some way this cul-de-sac could be used. Rev. Jim Udy became ill so his brother Gloster Udy took over. Rev. Dr. Gloster Udy (being the Australian Editor Upper Room magazine) was able to share some possible ways of utilising this sacred acre which was the first gift in Australia to the Methodist Church in 1817 by the then soldier settler John Lees who received a land grant in 1804.

      The proposal was submitted that the Upper Room be given a 99 year lease on the property, this was accepted and the goals of the Upper Room was:
      To paint the Chapel and Hall in heritage colours.
      Clear and repair the cemetery.
      Construct a Bell Tower and Cross.
      Build 6 cabins to accommodate persons when the property becomes a cul-de-sac. Accom. 48.
      To appoint a residential caretaker.
      This has all been done.

      ------------------

      From : Penrith City e-history (http://www.penrithcity.nsw.gov.au/print.asp?id=255)

      The original Methodist Church at Castlereagh is believed to be the first Methodist place of worship built in Australia. This first place of worship was a slab building attached to John Lee's home. Later he built a weatherboard chapel - opened in October 1817 - and gave it to the Methodist Church. Lees was a former member of the N.S.W. Corps and had led a life "highlighted by drink and gambling", until recovery from a snakebite precipitated his reform.

      The present church was built in 1847 for £450. The old chapel became the Wesleyan Common School until the State Education System was instituted and a school built opposite the church. The church was on the Penrith Methodist Circuit.

      In the later part of the nineteenth century the population of the Castlereagh region declined and there were no local trust members to maintain the church. As a result, the building became dilapidated until, in 1894, a trust was reorganised and the church was repaired and improved at a cost of £70.

      In 1984 a permanent conservation order was placed on the church building. The church, church hall, and adjoining cemetery are already classified by the National Trust.

      --------------------

      From: http://www.penrithcity.nsw.gov.au/index.asp?id=1476

      John Lees (c1777-1836)

      John Lees enlisted in the New South Wales Corp in September 1796 whilst still in England and sailed in the Ganges, arriving in the colony on the 2 June 1797. His future wife Mary Stevens arrived as a convict on the Earl Cornwallis on the 12 June 1801. His official land grant of 90 acres was awarded by Governor King on the 4 June 1804, but he was living in the Nepean district prior to that date. In February of that year the Sydney Gazette reported that his temporary residence was destroyed by fire and all of his belongings lost.

      John and Mary had ten children together, the first being born in 1802 and the last in 1821. They were married at St Phillips Church in Sydney on the 20 November 1809.

      John Lees was known for his love of alcohol, and while he seemed to keep it under control whilst establishing the farm, it soon began to control his life to the point that some of his land and a lot of his possessions were gone. It is purported that one night whilst getting a log of wood for the fire, he instead picked up a deadly snake that bit him on the wrist, although a second version of this tale implies that he dreamt the episode. Whichever mode the snake was visited upon him, it changed his life dramatically. He became a devout Christian and gave up the drunkenness of his old life. He gave an acre of land to the Wesleyan Church, built a small chapel on it and cultivated the land, giving whatever grew there to the church to spread the word of the Lord.

      John Lees died on the 28 August 1836 and was buried at the Church of England Cemetery at Castlereagh. A new church at Castlereagh was built in 1847 and in 1921 Mary and John Lees were re-interred at that site.

      --------------------------

      John Lees was born 1 in 1771 in Staffordshire, England. He died 2 on 28 Aug 1836 in Nepean River, NSW, Australia. He married 3 Mary Stevens on 20 Nov 1808 in St Phillips Church, Sydney, Nsw, Australia.

      Notes provided by Jenny Wellington

      Personal History
      Enlisted as a private in the 102nd Regiment of the New South Wales Corps on 18th September 1796 at Chatham, on the south bank of the Thames, thirty miles east of London. His name was included in a list of recruits raised by Lt. Col. Grose for two additional companies of the Corps. John Lees was a native of Stoke in Staffordshire when he enlisted at Chatham.

      Arrived in Australia on board the "Ganges" on 2 June, 1797 and served with the Corps until about 8 May 1803. The Monthly Pay List to 24th April 1803 showed an entry in Captain Wilson's company under privates:

      "John Lees 25th March to 24th April, 31 days, 14 shillings.
      Disch. in 14 days. Pay in advance."1

      On 26 February 1804 the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser reported that "a temporary residence on the Nepean belonging to John Lees, lately discharged from the New South Wales Corps and among the number that embraced the offer of becoming settlers, unfortunately took fire and was shortly consumed, together with every article of wearing apparel and its various other contents." It goes on to advise that John was issued with clothes from the stores.

      John Lees was officially granted 90 acres of land in an area known as Birds Eye Corner, by Governor King on 4 June 1804.2
      In June 1814 he gave 4 pounds to a subscription for a schoolhouse, a place of worship and a bridge.

      In the 1814 muster, he is shown with a wife and seven children "Off the Stores", as well as a convict servant, Jarvis Marshall.

      During his time as a private in the New South Wales Corp, John began to drink heavily, and continued to do so until about 1815. About this time he met the Rev. Samuel Leigh.

      On 7th October 1817, Samuel Leigh opened a small Methodist Chapel which had been erected by John at Castlereagh. Contemporary documents show that this chapel was attached to John's home. At the same time he donated one acre of his land to the church, and agreed to sow and reap the produce, for the use of the preachers.

      By 1820 it was evident that a larger chapel was required, and this was also built by John. A freestanding building on the other side of the creek from John's home.

      After the initial years of struggle, John began to prosper, and gave freely to the Church. In 1821 he petitioned for a further 80 acre grant, which he called "Stoke" in recognition of this native place in Staffordshire. This grant became official in 1831, with details being published in the Sydney Gazette dated 15 September 1831. On 21 January 1825, he applied for a further grant of land, which resulted in a grant of 283 acres to the east of his 80 acre grant. This was shown as "Pankle" on the Castlereagh Parish Map, and became official in 1831.

      On 23 February 1827 John and Mary moved to Sydney, living in a house in Castlereagh Street, until around 1829 when he had a stroke which paralysed him. They returned to Castlereagh.

      Books published about John Lees:

      "John Lees The Chapel Builder"
      Merle Kavanagh ISBN 0 7316 0188 2

      "The Story of a Remarkable Life. Pioneer, Soldier & Settler"
      Rev S.C. Roberts, Penrith
      Published by Nepean Times, Penrith.

      "A Legion of Lees"
      Merle Kavanagh ISBN 0 7316 2821 7

      WRITTEN AND RESEARCHED BY TIFFANY RAE as a student with the UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN SYDNEY (NEPEAN) AUSTRALIA:

      LEES, JOHN ( 1777-1836 ) Soldier, Landholder and farmer. I am unsure as to the exact date or place of birth as some of his background obscured this information. Several reasons explain the problem I had although I was able to ascertain out the year he was born from early parish burial records.
      John Lees was recruited by Lieutenant Colonel Grose into one of the two additional companies Grose was establishing for the New South Wales corps back in England.
      Lees was registered as a private in the 102nd regiment of the New South Wales corps.2 At the age of nineteen in 1796 he set sail on a convict ship, the Ganges from Portsmouth bound for Port Jackson Australia.3 Lees was listed on the Return of Pay list for the New South Wales corps foot, from 18 September 1796 to 24 June 1797, receiving seven pounds.4 This presumably covers his payment before and during his journey to Australia.
      The Ganges arrived in New South Wales on 2 June 1797(5) and Lees served under Captain Rowley with whom he stayed under as a private until around 1804. Lees is listed on the Muster Rolls and Pay Lists for the 102nd foot by the Public Record Office (P.R.O.) in London from 1798-99. During 1798-1799.(6) Lees was paid on the 24th of every month.(7) These records are only the pay list records and provide no real insight into the duties undertaken or locations where the regiment were stationed. On December 25 however it does remark that Captain Rowley's section was detached but does not give detail of where to.
      I was unable to find any documentation of when John Lees is discharged from the 102nd regiment but he does turn up in the General Muster of New South Wales in 1805. He settled in the Nepean district with a grant of 160 acres for his services in the army. During the same muster he is recorded to have purchased another 160 acres in the Field of Mars (now known as Marsfield).
      Lees is not listed in the next muster in 1811 that includes Norfolk Island and Van Diemen's Land. He has either left the colony (N.S.W) for awhile or did not turn up to the muster that year. Both of these options are a possibility as he was not recorded at the next muster in 1814 and people often did not come to the musters for various reasons. He is however listed in the 1822 muster citing the area he lives in as Windsor, he may have by then sold his property in Marsfield.
      Lees has quite a lot of correspondence with the Colonial Secretary from 1812 to 1825, now residing in the parish of Evan. On 12 September 1812 Lees is granted cattle from the government herds on credit. Throughout the Secretary' s correspondence Lees applies for grants of more cattle.
      He is a signatory to many petitions in the district, reflecting his character. These include a petition for the mitigation of sentence on behalf of a convict John Clarke, and a petition to return the common near Castlereagh, that was given to Captain King, back for its original purpose.
      Also a petition that public roads in the Evan district be surveyed. While all of this correspondence is not particularly exciting it reflects upon the type of man he was, motivated and willing enough to involve himself in public and individual's matter's concerning the area in which he lived. This is also illustrated by Lees inclusion on the jury list in the district of Windsor.
      On 10 May 1820 Lees writes to the Governor asking for grants of land and cattle to expand his property holdings. While forever humble, he does not forget to remind his excellency of his years of servitude in the New South Wales corps.
      He also mentions his family, documented here for the first time as having a wife and seven children. He also mentions that he still holds a part of the original grant given to him after being discharged from the army. From that request he receives another eighty acres.
      On 17 January 1825 he lists four convicts in his employ, those being, Thomas Clarke, Thomas Woodbridge, John Hughes and Robert Deaken. He also receives another 400 acres as a result of a memorial to the Governor requesting land in 1825. In all documented memorials to the Governor, Lees is successful in gaining any grants requested for, building on his properties to form a quite impressive holding. While not incredibly wealthy, from the information gathered, he appears to make a relatively comfortable living to support his large family and employees.
      Frustratingly, I was unable to re locate him until his death on 31 August 1836, making him 59 when he died. He was buried in Windsor.
      By piecing together bits of information from the Archives it is impressive how much about John Lees' life I have actually come up with.

      NOTES FOR JOHN LEES

      RECRUITMENT
      John Lees was subsisted for seventy eight days from 8 October to 24 December 1796 at a rate of eight pennies per day. A subsistence allowance is chiefly a British term that is an advance paid to an employee to reimburse expenses, or paid before their pay begins.

      1 Public Record Office, London. War Office, 1789-1796
      Musters Rolls and Pay Lists,
      A.O. New South Wales
      Veteran Company No. Reel 417.
      2 Ibid.
      3 Convict Guide
      A.O. New South Wales, p. 23.
      4 Public Record Office, London. War Office, 1789-1796
      Musters Rolls and Pay Lists,
      A.O. New South Wales No. Reel 417.
      5 Convict Guide
      A.O. New South Wales, p. 23.
      6 Public Record Office, London. War Office, 1789-1796
      Musters Rolls and Pay Lists,
      A.O. New South Wales No. Reel 417.
      7 Ibid.
      8 Ibid.
      9 Ibid.
      10 Public Record Office, London. War Office, 1789-1796
      Musters Rolls and Pay Lists,
      A.O. New South Wales No. Reel 417.
      11 Ibid.
      12 Baxter, C.J. (Editor)
      Musters of N.S.W. and Norfolk Island 1805-1806
      (GRR COD 509).
      13 Ibid.
      14 Ibid.
      15 Ibid.
      16 Ibid.
      17 Ibid.
      18 Ibid.
      19 Ibid.
      20 Ibid.
      21 Baxter, C.J. (Editor)
      General Land and Stock Muster 1822.
      A.O. N.S.W.
      22 Colonial Secretary's' Correspondence (C.S.C.)
      Index 1788-1825
      A.O. N.S.W., sz758, Reel 6038, p.315.
      23 Ibid.
      24 Ibid.
      4/1824B, No. 453
      Fiche 3091
      pp. 677-8
      25 Ibid.
      4/1854
      Fiche 3184, p. 47.
      26 Ibid.
      4/5782
      Reel 6017, pp. 299-301.
      27 Ibid.
      4/1843a, No. 500a. Fiche 3142, p.277.
      28 Colonial Secretary's' Correspondence (C.S.C.)
      Index 1788-1825
      4/1775
      Reel 6060, p. 188.
      29 Ibid.
      4/1824b, 453
      Fiche 3024, pp. 677-678.
      30 Ibid.
      31 Ibid.
      32 Ibid.
      33 Ibid.
      4/1843a, No. 459
      Fiche 3141, p. 53.
      34 Ibid.
      4/3514
      Reel 6014, p. 71.
      35 A.O. N.S.W. No. 5002
      Early Parish Records.
      1
      · His wage alternated between one pound eleven shillings and one pound ten shillings every second month.
      · The position of private was the lowest rank in the corps and the Lieutenant by comparison received ten pounds on average each month. The section remains at the same level of pay at that time and remains detached until the end of the reel on 24 July 1799.(11)
      · His acreage in Field Mars was primarily used for grazing with 146 of the 160 acres documented as being under pasture.(15) Lees was cultivating eight acres of wheat and six of maize.(16) He had two bushels of wheat and forty bushels of maize on hand at the time of the muster.(17)
      · He also had seven male and seven female hogs grazing on the property at the time.(18)
      · Although a modest property, he is listed as employing one convict and seven free men at that time.(19) He is also listed as the sole proprietor, without government assistance and has a wife and one child at this time.(20)

      CASTLEREAGH METHODIST CHURCH - CASTLEREAGH ROAD

      The original Methodist Church at Castlereagh is believed to be the first Methodist place of worship built in Australia. This first place of worship was a slab building attached to John Lee's home. Later he built a weatherboard chapel - opened in October 1817 - and give it to the Methodist Church. Lees was a former member of the N.S.W. Corps and had led a life "highlighted by drink and gambling", until recovery from a snakebite precipitated his reform.
      The present church was built in 1847 for £450. The old chapel became the Wesleyan Common School until the State Education System was instituted and a school built opposite the church. The church was on the Penrith Methodist Circuit.
      In the later part of the nineteenth century the population of the Castlereagh region declined and there were no local trust members to maintain the church. As a result, the building became dilapidated until, in 1894, a trust was reorganised and the church was repaired and improved at a cost of £70.
      In 1984 a permanent conservation order was placed on the church building. The church, church hall, and adjoining cemetery are already classified by the National Trust.

      ------------------------------

      From Field Family Newsletter 25

      NOTES RE - JAMES McLELLAND´S BOOK NO.5

      The Nepean River Valley, It´s History, It´s Floods, It´s people..

      CASTLEREAGH; Named by Governor Macquarie in 1810 after Lord Castlereagh.

      1789

      June. Captain Watkin Trench is sent by Governor Phillip to explore the country inland in an endeavour to find better pasture and agricultural land. he was the first person to sight the Nepean River, it was later named Nepean by Governor Macquarie after Sir Ivan Nepean, Under Secretary for the Navy.

      A guard hut is erected on a rise of land named Rose Hill and plans are drawn up to establish a village at what is now Parramatte.

      1790

      Layout of Parramatta Village completed.

      Small patrols of soldiers venture through the forests to the Nepean, but the major activity of the colony is centred around Parramatta and Sydney.

      1791

      Governor Phillip journeys to Windsor and names it Green Hills, it is renamed later by Governor Macquarie.

      Population of Parramatta is now 1,818, of whom 1,669 are convicts..

      Small villages now exist at Prospect, Mt. Druitt, Windsor and Richmond, some odd huts along George´s River, near present day Liverpool.

      August 1794 Now settlers´ working small farms along the Hawkesbury River, a good track has been worn through the forests to Sydney.

      1796

      Many of the original settlers on the Nepean Hawkesbury River abandon their farms because of ignorance of farming methods and the difficulty of getting their produce to the Sydney market. As the settlers abandon their farms, they are bought up cheaply by merchants and officers of the N.S.W. Corps.

      1799

      Some Irish Rebels, who were to play their part in the history of the Penrith District, arrived in Sydney as convicts on the Convict Transport Minerosa. Included were Rev. Henry Fulton.

      1800

      Some freed convicts began settling along the Nepean River. Some were: Pierce Collett, Randall, Rope, Colin Fields, Lees, McCarthy, etc.

      1803

      August 7th 1803. Governor King advises Lord Hobart in England that he has stopped any further settlement along the Nepean.

      Cillits, Mary. Free woman, arrived colony and was granted 70 acres of land at Castlereagh in July 1803. She had her husband, who was a convict, assigned to her.

      Field, Edward. Private N.S.W. Corp. granted land 1803 on the Nepean at Castlereagh neat Jackson´s lane and Methodist Church. His son, also named Edward, married Maria Strickland and after her death he was married again to one Esther Lees.

      1806

      Heavy floods ravished the Nepean.

      1808

      March. heavy rainfall, bad floods down the Nepean
      1809

      Again, heavy rainfall and bad flooding along the Nepean.

      1810

      Governor Lachlan Macquarie arrives in the colony.
      Colony sheep population now 33,000

      In 1810, the first year of his long term of office which continued until 1821, Macquarie made an extended tour of N.S.W.

      He was greatly troubled by what he heard about floods which had done much damage to farmland and property along the Hawkesbury River. To provide the settlers with extra allotments on higher ground - where they would be encouraged to build their homes and store their produce. - Macquarie brought into being five new townships. These were called Windsor, previously known as green Hills, Richmond, Wilberforce, Pitt-town and Castlereagh.

      The first four towns were set on the Hawkesbury, but Castlereagh was situated on the Nepean. The Nepean River is really part of the Hawkesbury, but was discovered separately, in 1789, and given a different name. This is one of those quirks of history which can never be corrected.

      Each of Macquarie´s five towns was carefully planned and properly surveyed, with provision for streets, important buildings, and a market square.

      ``God prosper Saint Matthew´s Church´´ said Governor Macquarie at a simple ceremony at Windsor in 1817, when he laid the corner-stone, under which had been placed a ´´holey dollar´´ . This was a Spanish silver dollar with a hole punched in it, the centre being taken out in order to create an extra coin. The value given to a ``holey dollar´´ was six shillings and three pence, sterling, for use as currency in the colony.

      A few hours after the stone had been laid, some rascal overturned it and got away with the money. The Government agreed to repeat the ceremony, and two days later another ´´holey dollar´´ was laid down for prosperity. But the second dollar went the way of the first, for the stone was overturned again and the culprit escaped detection.

      Hawkesbury Museum at 5 Thompson Square, windsor occupies the site where John Howe - a free settler from Britain - conducted a general store from 1811 until the late 1830´s.

      As the Daniel O´Connell Inn, conducted by Edward Coffey, the building which is now the museum became the most popular hotel around the Hawkesbury in the 1840s. it was the hub of social, political, and sporting life; its distinguished patrons included Governor Sir George Gipps and his successor, Sir Charles Fitz Roy.

      The Doctor´s House, is perched above the river bank on the town side of Windsor Bridge...... the building was Coffey´s Hotel.

      1811

      Collitts Pierce. Convict, assigned to his wife Mary Collits of Castlereagh. Pardoned and appointed Chief Constable for Penrith District.

      Lord, Simon. 18th October, 1811 granted 1170 acres of land at Penrith.

      1812

      First school in Penrith District established at Castlereagh.

      1815

      Name of ferry boat the ``Pheasant´´ first recorded for taking passengers across the Nepean River.

      1816

      Lord, Simon. 8th October,1816 granted 100 acres of land at Penrith.

      S.M.H. 31st March . Five settlers were killed and many others fled their homes along the Nepean River during clashes with Aborigines.

      1817

      Floods again hit Nepean and Hawkesbury.

      Sir John Jamison, Rev. Henry Fulton, John McHenry and a military officer appointed to act as Magistrate at Penrith Court.

      John Lees donated land at Castlereagh for first Methodist Church.

      Phillip Strickland, born 1786 died 6th November, 1817, pioneer d. Anglican Church Cranebrook Cemetery.

      1819

      James McHenry conducted a blacksmiths shop next to the Court House, Penrith the property called Lemongrove.

      1820

      Two of George Wentworth´s children drowned in the Nepean.

      1821

      Rev. Henry Fulton former Irish Rebel and convict, appointed Magistrate at Castlereagh.

      1825

      First body of Mounted Police formed in Australia by Governor Brisbane, the first force consisting of two officers and thirteen troopers.

      1826

      The ``Monitor´´ a weekly Sydney newspaper, began publication.

      Field, Edward, Pioneer. Died 21st January, 1826 aged 57 years, name of wife Elysabeth. Buried Anglican Cranebrook Cemetery.
      1827

      Government ordered that there were no Ministers available school teachers perform funeral services and receive a fee of 2/6d. As no cemeteries were available most estates had burial plots in corners of a distant pasture.

      22/10/1827 Extract from letter of Harriet King from Dunheved.
      penrith is about six miles from here, towards the river, there is a Court House, Inn and a few huts. It is said a town is to be laid out on the plains and a hospital and Surgeon established.

      1828

      S.M.H. The NSW Government established a twice-weekly horse post between the principal inland towns, with a letter from Sydney to Bathurst costing 1 shilling in postage.

      1830

      Little progress was made in the Colony now for over twenty years until Gold was discovered. Rust attached the wheat along the Nepean, the sheep developed footrot and more families packed up and left the Nepean and crossed over the mountains because of the promise of free land grants.

      1831

      S.M.H. The first steamship built in Australia - the 25 tonne S.S. Surprise - was launched at Neutral Bay.
    Person ID I997  The Rawsthorne Family Tree
    Last Modified 14 Nov 2015 

    Father John LEES,   b. 14 Mar 1750, Oldham, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Jan 1815, Ashton Under Lyne, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Mother Lori Jean LARSON,   b. 1751, Staffordshire, Worcestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Cheshire, New Hampshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship Natural 
    Family ID F8896  Group Sheet

    Family Mary Carter STEVENS,   b. 03 May 1778, Charlynch, Somerset, England, United Kingdom Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jul 1839, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years) 
    Married 20 Nov 1809  St Phillips Church, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
     1. Maria LEES,   b. 07 Sep 1802, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Dec 1819, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 17 years)
     2. Hannah LEES,   b. 25 Jun 1804, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Dec 1874, Back Creek, Cowra, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     3. Richard Thomas LEES,   b. 05 Aug 1805, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Nov 1891, Bandon Station, Forbes, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     4. John LEES,   b. 19 Sep 1807, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Dec 1848, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 41 years)
     5. Mary LEES,   b. 27 Sep 1809, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 04 Jan 1877, Brodies Plains, Inverell, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
     6. Esther LEES,   b. 12 Jan 1812, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jul 1875, Forbes, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)
     7. Samuel LEES,   b. 12 Nov 1813, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jun 1818, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 4 years)
     8. Timothy LEES,   b. 19 Dec 1815, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Aug 1876, Shingle House Hotel, Walgett, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
     9. Sarah LEES,   b. 20 Apr 1818, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Feb 1902, Castlereagh, Livingstone Road, Marrickville, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
     10. Cornelius LEES,   b. 25 Jul 1821, Castlereagh, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 08 Mar 1886, Springwood, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
    Last Modified 14 Nov 2015 
    Family ID F481  Group Sheet

  • Sources 
    1. [S393] Public Member Trees, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;), Database online.
      Record for John Lees

    2. [S410] Kay E RADFORD.